Code sharing options

As I’m proceeding with Python MOOC, I had to choose a way to share my code with my peers. There are many options in fact. Here are some of them:

GitHub 

This was recommended by the MOOC instructions. This is a multifunctional platform that allows you to create repositories, gists and forks, follow users, publish privately or openly, download codes and leave comments. What I also like about it is that you can follow users. For sharing homework gists might be the best option.

github

There are two shortcomings though:

  • You can’t publish your code without registration
  • Some users complain that the interface is a bit too complicated, so it takes time to get used to it

Pastebin

This is an extremely easy to use sharing tool. Actually, what you first see at the main page is a box where you can paste your code. You don’t have to register to do it (so you simply have a link that you can later share). You can also set the expiration time for each publication (from 10 minutes to never). And you can make it public, unlisted or private (for members only). You can also register if you like (I did to keep my homework in order).

Pastebin

Shortcomings:

  • I haven’t seen any commenting option, which might be good for feedback and revision while learning
  • I also couldn’t find any option to follow other members.

DPaste 

This is a very minimalistic service. You can’t register, you only can paste your code and save it. After you do it, it will stay there for 30 days and then it’ll be automatically deleted. So it’s good for quick sharing purposes, but not for continuous and systematic use.

dpaste

Also I recently found Bitbucket 

But I haven’t explored it yet. If anyone has some experience, please share. There are some explanations as to how to use it though: Bitbucket 101.

As for me, I’m currently using GitHub and Pastebin, because GitHub looks like a wonderful working space and Pastebin is good for sharing with those who are scared of GitHub:

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Python MOOC – Week 1

2013-06-23 07_43_22-The Mechanical MOOC – A Gentle Introduction to Python _ Free range open learning

So, a new (the fourth, as far as I understand) sequence of Python Mechanical MOOC officially started a week ago. This week happened to be extremely busy in my case, so I actually had less time for learning than I hoped I would. But thanks to the Codecademy lessons I took some time ago, the first bunch of tasks didn’t contain too much new information for me. But at the same time it contained quite a number of fascinating and revealing details. For one, I found out from this video lecture that some languages allow using false indentation. That is, unlike Python where indentation is the only way to make a script work properly, many other languages use punctuation to separate statements. But indentation is still required by convention to make a programme clearly readable and its semantics more obvious from its structure. So to make people think that the programme does something different from what it really does, some coders may use this false indentation e.g. in Java or C. But not in Python however.

Also, as I think that during these 8 weeks’ period Python is supposed to be my primary learning focus, I decided to take into account some additional Python courses that might provide a better understanding of what’s going on. One of them is Python Programming 101 at P2PU. And actually there’s a lot of additional information there. For instance, there’s a list of Python compatible text editors. What I like best about it is peer reviews of the editors they tried. So I’ll have to save this for the future:

But for now I’m using IDLE, because I don’t have enough time to try all of them right now. Although I’ve installed Notepad ++ just in case.

Also I’m looking forward to getting involved in OpenStudy communication, but I haven’t yet, because I’ve been a bit overloaded (like a + operator) with work.

Tableau Public: trying out

My first visualisation ever. Just tested a tool. It’s called Tableau Public and it’s free.

Could be better, but practice makes perfect as they usually say in these cases. TP is really cool. But I can’t embed it into this blog, because:

There is also a service called www.WordPress.com which lets you get started with a new and free WordPress-based blog, but it is less flexible than the WordPress you download and install yourself. Blogs hosted on WordPress.com do not take advantage of tools like Tableau that use JavaScript.

(TP FAQ)

OK. Here’s a screenshot preview.

Workbook  TEST

And here’s its interactive version.

And now I’ll go’ n’ kill myself.